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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  October 23, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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of europe watching a beyond 100 days. the widow of a dead us soldiers said president trump could not remember her husband's name when he phoned to after condolences. her account goes the criticism of a democratic congresswoman who hit out at the president's insensitively. but donald trump disputes the account given, insisting he had been very respectful. telling tales after dinner, a german newspaper said the british by minister begged europe to help her with the negotiation but who briefed the reporter? and the cata la n who briefed the reporter? and the catalan parliament threatens to ratify independence of madrid moves to reassert control. also on to reassert control. also programme, thousands of young girls dealing with the consequences of becoming a bride far too soon. i think about
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what i could have done or could have been. and the french president's dog making quite a splash giving a meeting. and let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag. hello and welcome. it's a solemn obligation, calling the grieving wife of a fallen soldier. for a president, nojob is harder and more important. but last tuesday, 12 days after for green beret ‘s were killed in niger, the widow of sergeant david johnson received a call from trumpet in her view was so incensed —— was so —— was so incensed that reduced
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editors. today, marie should johnson corroborated what frederica wilson told us. she said he was unable to remember her name. it's the president, he said he knew what he signed up for what it hurts anyway. it made me cry because i was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said that. he could not remember my husband's name. the only way he remembered his name was that he told me he had the report in front of him. that's when he actually said la david. i heard him stumbling trying to remember the name. that was hurting me the most because if my husband is out there fighting for our country, and he risks his life at our country, why can't you remember his name? shortly after that
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interview mr trump responded writing this on twitter... that i speak to the washington bureau chief for the chicago sun times. thanks forjoining us. i guess it's one thing to take on a democratic congresswoman, it's quite another to take on the widow. this is extraordinary by any circumstances of presidential behaviour. what you are seeing and what the world is seeing in how president trump decided to keep a few going —— a feud going even after this woman's husband, the day her husband was buried he sent out a tweet, a provocative one, accusing this congresswoman of being wacky, and even today most of us and so many people around the world of
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killing occurred now as a human, it's hard, —— it's hard to give condolences. if i say something to hurt you, you should make it better because they lost a loved one and you did not. last week i got the impression that the white house was time to shut this issue down to move on and talk about the things they want to talk about, tax reform or whatever. do you think the people in the white house saw the tweet from the president this morning and thought by now. they've had a week of stumble. i was in the press briefing room last week when john kelly, stumble. i was in the press briefing room last week whenjohn kelly, t., himself a father, himself knowing the grief that goes on, went in the beginning of his heartfelt talk talk about the chilling effect it is to have a child killed in the military. then he went on to attack the congresswoman and he was not right in his facts which created another pa rt in his facts which created another part of the controversy. this has snowballed. what is well known is
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that nobody can control president trump's tweet and today is just the latest exa m ple. trump's tweet and today is just the latest example. looking from over here, it seems this is running badly all the way from the beginning. what she said this interview today was she said this interview today was she was taken aback at the president michael her en route to receiving the casket as he was flown back in? this deserves attention. that had to be some lack of staff activity, this is one where we have human experience. he makes a call like that when somebody is on their way to pick up the body of a loved one? most people must understand it is one of the most stressful moments of your life, it might not be the moment you want even the president in the best of circumstances, to make that call. this is just another situation that was made worse partly by not even, possibly should not
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happen in that day and time. the are confounded about it and i understand. thanks forjoining us.. the conflicting accounts will be subject of a congressional hearing this week but also questions about the deployment more generally. some senior senators including some on the senate armed services committee seem unaware the us has a thousand soldiers in niger. this spurned this with top tele macro response in the new york times. aside from those operations we do
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know about in iraq, syria and afghanistan, the authorisation for the war on terror sign 16 years ago has been used by successive presidents to expand combat operations to the philippines, yemen, djibouti, somalia, niger among others. that speak to a special forces veteran who served in iraq and afghanistan. does it surprise frustrate you that santa is that lindsay graham who sits on the armed services committee doesn't seem armed services committee doesn't seem to know that the us has a thousand armed soldiers in niger?m actually appalling and brings disbelief, the armed services committee are brief and these missions. the armed services committee was briefed on this and centres like lindsay spend better attention. in these classifieds
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briefings, good congress do more to keep a check and balance on what the white house is doing and where he is deploying soldiers? should they be more involved? i don't know if they should be more involved or not, they certainly have oversight abilities and they certainly have a say in how these deployments go and i think it's downright cowardly for them after the fact it to pretend that they did not know this was happening. that is similarly to what happened in benghazi in 2012 in that many of our politicians claimed they had no idea we had people in libya, that simply isn't too, they were briefed on that as well. that simply isn't too, they were briefed on that as welllj that simply isn't too, they were briefed on that as well. i was going to ask you about the comparisons between benghazi and what has happened in niger. is it fair to draw those comparisons? it's like comparing apples and oranges. 0ne circumstance was the combating of
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boko haram and ices in that particular country. what happened in benghazi was different, a counsellor got attacked, there's a lot of foreshadowing and precipitation of that attack that we should have been aware of. it was attacked to the state department and caa, it was different and you can't compare them. what we do know, and. information is sketchy, what is your theory on how the soldiers were detached from any back—up and support? simply because niger is a landlocked country in africa, a huge continent where you can get the whole us in that twice over. in afrikaans, the african command, it's not in africa, it's in stuttgart in germany. how you going to support
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operations in central africa is mystifying. this is how it goes. there's only so many assets that we have available and there's not enough logistics to supply every special forces mission all across the globe 2a seven. special forces mission all across the globe 24 seven. they call these misused train and advise, supporting local troops but is thatjust a coverfor local troops but is thatjust a cover for the covert missions that go on in this country is? at times that happens but in this case, no. it was a foreign internal defence where us special forces go it was a foreign internal defence where us specialforces go in it was a foreign internal defence where us special forces go in a training locals and sometimes they we re training locals and sometimes they were accompanied on operations or getting closer to the battlefield. we've seen this recently in other countries that the philippines. us special advisers and marine special operations assisted philippine forces on the seed. they want on the front lines. this is similar to the
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media assignment. thanks forjoining us. media assignment. thanks forjoining us. these are the sort of things mrs johnson wants, what went wrong and why did this happen? after last week, the president might have been cleaned drop it? it's the president has done a reading of survival lessons and is more keen eye for an eye, then he is with turning the other cheek. i'm sure an awful lot of people on the white house and capitol hill wishes he'd done the latter. that's not the roles, we know that. it attack, attack. let's talk about things here, the british minister has updated mps this afternoon on the progress of the brexit negotiators after meeting with eu leaders last week. but its theme the counter last wednesday, that is though much the focus. the report in a german
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newspaper claimed theresa may begs jean—claude juncker for help and suggests that she appeared anxious and tormented. here is alex forsyth. prime minister, what are you putting on the table? this time last week, the prime minister left downing street for brussels. her aim, to try to unblock brexit talks over dinner with senior figures from the eu. the meal in the belgian capital was officially called constructive. then, this emerged. an account in a german newspaper, which said that mrs may, under political pressure at home, had pleaded for help from the eu. the president of the european commission reportedly said that she'd looked nervous and disheartened. jean—claude juncker, according to the newspaper, said the prime minister seemed like she had not slept for days. this morning, his senior aide rejected the reports. he said... he claimed it was an attempt to frame the eu side and undermine talks.
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and at a press briefing in brussels, a commission spokesman said this... we have a lot of work. and no time for gossip. i have to be very clear that presidentjuncker would never have used the words attributed to him and never would have said anything like this. we have never been punitive on brexit. we have said at all levels, on many occasions, that we are working for a fair deal. the european commission president was asked by the leak by our european correspondent, take a listen to what he had to say. can we ask about the dinner with mrs may, can you tell the press will happen?
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never i'm surprised and shocked at what has been written in the german press and repeated by the british press. nothing is true in all this. i had press. nothing is true in all this. ihad an press. nothing is true in all this. i had an excellent working dinner with theresa may, she was in good shape, she was not tired, she was fighting as is her duty so everything for me was ok. she didn't plead with you for help? no, that's not the style of british prime ministers. jean-claude juncker. there was concern about what happens when the due killing the e0, business leaders called for a swift agreement —— leaving the eu, business leaders could for a transition. theresa may remains optimistic that a deal can be agreed. mr speaker, i am ambitions and positive about the future of britain's negotiations.
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if we're going to take a step forward together, it must be on the basis ofjoint effort and endeavour between the uk and the eu but i believe that by approaching these negotiations in a constructive way, in the spirit of friendship and cooperation, we can and will deliver the best possible outcome that works for all our people. let's go into this with iain duncan smith hoof supported —— let's big iain duncan smith supported brexit. i surprise? now, i'm used to this. the office has a track record, the same paper as i recall had another one before the election, another briefing given to them from apparently the president's office about much the same topic, the views and the prime minister at the views and the prime minister at the time and the rest of it. this appears again in a german newspaper, the same one. maybejean—claude juncker had directly nothing to do with it but am absolutely certain
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that it appears from all that is being said from journalists that his chief of staff in brussels, this is very much his kind of work. it may well have backfired on him. he denies it? he's probably done it. there's a lot about him now that is not very edifying, i have to say. he is turning the president of the european union into kind of trump like figure which is not very helpful in the course of these talks. he has denied it today as have mrjean—claude juncker. let's talk about the issues in parliament today, theresa may was revising what went on in brussels last week. a lot of focus on the transition. your conservative colleaguejohn redwood said firms should prepare for a smooth transition to wto tariffs but expect the pm to bring home something better, is that sensible advice? very sensible advice to
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expect that the firms themselves recognise that if we don't get a free trade arrangements then we will have to have another amazement. there is no vacuum. people talk right now free—trade arrangement and no deal rather than a deal. the fact is there is a deal or a different deal, and a different deal with we are trying to agreed but they've been resistant to talking about there we hope to buy christmas, is a free—trade arrangement which is logged in the wto as we leave, that would be the best circumstance providing it's a good one. alternative is you leave under the wto terms which rest of the world operates under successfully, that way or may not entail tariff. the wto allows leading countries to have access to services that don't have to open up the rest of the worth ten yea rs. to open up the rest of the worth ten years. it's feasible to years
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telling macro leave under wto terms that still have a zero tariff agreed, still going on. there are different ways of doing it that the key point is, businesses should stop worrying about the transition or in fermentation period because that surely can only be decided once you know what the arrangements are and that as yet has not been decided, notwithstanding the fact the british wa nt to notwithstanding the fact the british want to do it. the need to focus on the eventual outcome. eisai organisation should be less word, isn't it theirjob to stand up for members' interest and they believe it will be damaging to the uk if there is no agreement? the head of goldman sachs ones he will take jobs to frankfurt, that did seriously damage the financial services industry, do you agree or be damaging to the economy if there is no agreement? if there is no agreement at all, it's an agreement
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under wto terms, you don't walk out into a vacuum, that the killing of global set of rules and it has to be under those. it would be impossible to walk away and have no agreement on those basis because that would be asked and the eu having an relationship worse than iran and the eu. it is about a free—trade arrangement with them with a full negotiation element with financial services. you say that both of uk, every worth of the uk as a general belief in the first instance than say, a free—trade arrangement providing it's a good one. but it's also damaging for the eu. the user does a much higher proportion of six trade with us such as machinery, and without the goods except, we the single biggest marketplace the eu when we leave and that would be ridiculous for them not to want to have some kind of arrangement. so
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the question isn't to say to business don't worry, the idea is you need to get that arrangement but if you don't it will be under wto arrangement and they should make the plans for the wto setup but hope that we get that arrangement at the same time. so to squeeze you, iain duncan smith, thanks forjoining us. spanish prime minister has promised to is expected to give authority to call new elections. the catalan leader has resisted internal pressure to formally declare independence about the refused to rule it out. they create divisions with the rest of... let's speak to oui’ with the rest of... let's speak to our guest. thanks for joining with the rest of... let's speak to our guest. thanks forjoining us. is the biggest concern for people,
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how this unfold once the government ta kes how this unfold once the government takes back control of catalonia because we saw what happened during the referendum, how would the national police move in and reassert its authority? using one expression, thatis its authority? using one expression, that is yours, let's notjump the gun. for the moment, this is a return to the rule of law, they true vision under our constitution. it's the same article for the german constitution, in article 137, it is oui’ constitution, in article 137, it is our senate that is examining the initiative by the government. what has to be taken into account as the things in my opinion. firstly, the government has set in motion this constitutional provision, reluctant. and the second is that what the
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government as look for is a broad consensus of constitutional parties. this is a constitutional issue, this isa this is a constitutional issue, this is a big issue. the government has look for and seeks the backing of the two constitutional abiding or constitutionalist and parties. they have a big role in the spanish life which is the socialist party, that is the other important but i can list of our transition. of our constitutional framework. the other is the new liberal... the issue that worries people watching from europe is that you have a situation where the government in spain says it retaking control and on the same day on friday, the possibility that the cata la n on friday, the possibility that the catalan parliament will declare independence, what happens then realistically? what happens again is that we have a constitution, we have
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a leader, we have spent as a country where rule of law prevail. what this provision is is not for taking control, it is just to bring provision is is not for taking control, it isjust to bring back the constitutional rule and the rule of law to catalonia. because right 110w of law to catalonia. because right now what we have is still today, the authorities are succession list authorities. that is in europe, there has been a proud consensus on understanding that the european union is a construction of law and bylaw, i understand that this insta nt bylaw, i understand that this instant message culture of hours, these hundred and 40 characters, just going into constitution into the rule of law but this is a business. so to interrupt but isn't that going to exacerbate tensions
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extremely if you have a situation where there are national police coming into catalonia and telling local police they had to stand down? you know, what do you want? do you wa nt to you know, what do you want? do you want to circumvent the rule of law? is this what spain has to do? if spain just let is this what spain has to do? if spainjust let this go is this what spain has to do? if spain just let this go forward, just a succession list regional government, just going beyond the constitutional order, then this is a big blow for democracy. in europe and beyond europe, democracy as a system. within the framework of the constitution, everything. the constitution, everything. the constitution has provisions, you can reform the constitution but the constitution is a ground rule and this has to be respected. thanks for the joining us. it will be interesting to see what
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happens in the next few days, probably a good deal of tension. happens in the next few days, probably a good deal of tensionm will be interesting to see what the civil service and police do, the cata la n civil service and police do, the catalan foreigners say they are expected to continue working with the parliament in catalonia and barcelona. what happens of the parliament isn't there and been dissolved by madrid, do they continue sitting, do they get in, didn't have the boat declared their independence? all eyes on barcelona on friday. this is an par from the bbc. coming up the viewers on the bbc. coming up the viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news, the czech republic donald trump, what this tells us about voters in the central european public? from the central european public? from the city of killing occurred that never sleeps, has —— the city of new york is taking steps so it's not caught napping. no huge changes to our
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weather tomorrow, there is a bit of rain in the forecast and it's going to remain pretty mild particularly across the southern half of the uk. a lot of cloud out there in the atlantic, this is a typical autumn picture and most of the cloud that leaves for the moment, are streaming in from the south—west and there a daisy chain of whether fronts up there, this is where the mile there isa there, this is where the mile there is a gross and it's moving sluggishly across our direction. do this evening and overnight, the daisy—chain of whether approaches and it means that cloud, myths, truths all, hill fog and rain getting into pembrokeshire with the weather front extending to north uk. look at the first morning temperatures, rush—hour on tuesday, we have 15 in plymouth, taunton 16, we have 15 in plymouth, taunton16, 15 in london, gloucester around 16, a little bit colder there, less mild i should say in the north around
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1113 degrees, maybe in belfast were but it's raining as well so not a grey start to the date but at least it's not freezing cold. what's going to happen to the course of the day? the weather front keeps flooding in from —— spreading from the south—west but the southern counties might get some brightness, it will be too wet there. in newcastle and belfast temperatures will be in at least the mid—if not high teens. through wednesday, it looks like the northern two thirds will biting, and the weather that will sit in the south on top of us, it will be mild but a south on top of us, it will be mild buta fair south on top of us, it will be mild but a fair bit of cloud particularly across south—western areas of the uk. on thursday, and looks at the clouds will increase again, and there's not an awful lot of change has negated this week, some sunshine and cloud and back to sunshine, and rain thrown in. high—pressure looks
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like it's set to build across the uk as we head into friday and the uk, the jet streams to the north of us but as refined the jet stream make drag in some of the cool air if not colder air, to at least northern parts of the uk through the course of the weekend. so settled but it will turn a bit colder. this is beyond 100 days. 0ur our top stories, the widow of a fall in us soldier demands answers on why she isn't allowed to see her husband's body. theresa may says is ambitious and positive about brexit talks, but behind the scenes, reports suggest a different story. coming up in the next 30 minutes, president trump says he is good for business. in this case, it is the newspaper business feeling a boost. you thought knife like —— nightlife isn't what it used to be... get in touch with us. it is nearly three weeks since us
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troops were attacked in niger, there are conflicting reports on what happened. there will be an investigation on it. we know that four green beret ‘s were killed. as we have discussed, the call made toa as we have discussed, the call made to a widow last week has done nothing to ease family pain this morning. mrsjohnson spoke about the questions she now wants answered. i want to know why it took them 48 hours to find my husband. why couldn't i see my husband? every timei couldn't i see my husband? every time i asked to see my husband, they didn't let me. what did they tell you? they told me that he is in a severe rap and i wouldn't be able to
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see him. i need to see him so i know thatis see him. i need to see him so i know that is my husband. i don't know nothing. they won't show me a finger, a hand. i know my husband's body from head to toe, and they won't let me see anything. i don't know what's in that box. it could be due, for all i know. i need to see my husband. i haven't seen him since he came home. pj he came home. pj crowley joins us he came home. pj crowleyjoins us in the studio. welcome to you. i will ask you two questions on. one is your sense of an overview of what is happening. secondly, why wouldn't they let the widow see her dead husband's body? i'm also a retired air force colonel. i understand both perspectives of this. in some cases, the body is in a very difficult situation, particularly if he is
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offered egregious wound in the attack. the military impulse is to spare the family that final picture. by spare the family that final picture. by the same token, ultimately, if the family pushes hard enough, the military should respond to that. it would make an horrific situation even worse. just briefly how the situation has been handled by the white house in the last week to ten days. miserably. this is a case where, while the president is breaking the mould of what presidential means, this is where he has done damage, not only to his administration, but wounded others in the process. a week ago, or the president needed to do was to respond to questions in a presidential manner. but he said, he is engaged with military families, he understands the sacrifice, but i do not think this is something that needs to be discussed in public, but i understand the sacrifice our
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troops are making in places like niger. he gave an unusual response, a harmful response, and now others are ensnared in this, including his g. four. rex tillerson has been travelling today, he has travelled a lot, he was in cabral and baghdad today. he got short shrift in baghdad. he said at the weekend that he wanted the iranians militia to withdraw. but they say that is unnecessary. 14 years into this transitional period in a rut, and still the secretary of state cannot make and announced visit to an ally like iraq stop that tells you something about the uncertainty that overhangs the future of iran, given the kurdish question about its aspiration for
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independence. but then again, this isa independence. but then again, this is a horse that left the barn a long time ago. there is no question, the primary beneficiary of invading iraq in 2003 is iran, and their influence is still there stop it is fair to say that iraq's challenge going forward , say that iraq's challenge going forward, and the state itself, should have a monopoly on the major use of force. it needs to get its arms around the various militia that undercut iraqi sovereignty. this is something that is a fundamental challenge for the iraqi government. the lever is re—add —— they need to get more involved. they have had productive meetings, reconnecting the relationship between baghdad and re—0'connell which was severed many yea rs re—0'connell which was severed many years ago. it may be more feasible
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—— riyadh. anything the saudis do will be beneficial, but this is still going to be a long—term challenge. thank you for your time and your insight. great to have you with us. when you mention child marriage, it is usually due to concerns about practices in developing countries. but in the us, 25 out of 50 states have no minimum age to be legally married. every year, it is thought thousands of often not even tina ‘s, get married to men. —— teenagers. what happened to angel here in america may seem unexpected. she feels her childhood was torn away from her. at the age ofjust 13,
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feels her childhood was torn away from her. at the age ofjust13, she says her mother forced from her. at the age ofjust13, she says her motherforced her from her. at the age ofjust13, she says her mother forced her into a marriage. i would love to go back—to—school. marriage. i would love to go back-to-school. after years of feeling there was no way out, she finally escaped, and is speaking out about her childhood marriage for the first time. i was a slave to my ex. i was first time. i was a slave to my ex. iwasa first time. i was a slave to my ex. i was a slave to the idea that my mother wanted us to all be together, to have kids young stock and to do all of that, i still have all of this emotional baggage of wanting to have done something with my life by 110w. have done something with my life by now. but i haven't been able to, because i was too busy taking care of kids. it is really all the time that i think about what i could have done, or could have been. angel's marriage fits an international pattern of child brides being far more likely not to get an education, and to face ireland abuse. we might be talking about angel's story here in rural idaho, but this
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isa story here in rural idaho, but this is a national problem, because children are permitted to marry across this country, with some states having no set minimum marriage age at all. we extrapolate from the data, and estimate, in all 50 states, approximately a quarter ofa 50 states, approximately a quarter of a million children that were married in america between 2000 and 2010. again, if we look at the data we have from 38 states, we know this is overwhelmingly girls to adult men. cherie johnson is trying to convince politicians in her home state of florida to change the laws that allowed her to be forced to marry at the age ofjust11. that allowed her to be forced to marry at the age ofjust iii that allowed her to be forced to marry at the age ofjust11. i got married to my rapist. the guy that raped me. my mother saw fit for me to marry him to make the situation of me getting pregnant, i can say, to make it look better overall. so,
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rather than putting the handcuffs on him, at 20 years of age, they put the handcuffs on me at age 11. for many, it is shocking to see the numbers in black and white on an american marriage certificate. shocking is, still, to know that in much of the country, there is nothing to stop it happening again today. let's get a round—up of the latest news. tension is building ahead of kenya's presidential election rerun on tuesday. the chief prosecutor says she should be charged with inciting violence. the prosecutor claims she caused damage at an election centre. the vote is being boycotted by some, saying it is not free orfair. driving is carbon dioxide emissions are making the oceans more acidic, predicting
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that infancy creatures will be especially harmed. a british man diving off the western australian coast has had an amazing escape from a shark, jon craig became separated from his boat and was stalked by a giant tiger shark. he managed to swims .5 from was stalked by a giant tiger shark. he managed to swims .5from it is back to shore. he said shark was extremely close and curious, and kept trying to work out what he was. and if he was going to be on the menu 01’ and if he was going to be on the menu or not. more and more young americans are signing up for online subscriptions to national print publications. papers like the new york times, would you believe, and magazines like the atlantic. they are enjoying increases of over 100% in the last year, according to reuters what is going on there? i thought it was the failing new york times...” went to baseball and i was sitting
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next to a newspaper executive, weirdly enough. he started talking to me. he said we need to enjoy the model of the washington times, who have cashed in brilliant lee on the anti—trump sentiment there is in america. he felt his newspaper group hadn't done that in. it seems at times, i think real collusion is between the new york times and donald trump will stop every time the new york times need a boost, they ring up donald trump and beg him to say they are failing. he is good for business, they wheel out these numbers that show that all their figures these numbers that show that all theirfigures are these numbers that show that all their figures are up at the moment because of donald trump. we would be out of business without him as well, of course. if you feel there aren't enough populist billionaire leaders featured on beyond 100 days, we have another one for you. there is said to bea another one for you. there is said to be a new checkpoint minister after winning 30% in the general election. he is the second richest man with a rich fortune made in chemicals, food
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and media. the omens two newspapers and media. the omens two newspapers and a radio station. he has missed to run the country like a business but there have been? ‘s over his finances. he has been charged with fraud and faces investigation over how he obtained eu funds for a farm and conference centre. he has a line on anti—eu rhetoric, which we will oppose my grip quotas set by brussels. we caught up with rob cameron in brussels, and we askedif rob cameron in brussels, and we asked if the donald trump comparisons are fair. we shouldn't get too carried away comparisons with donald trump. yes, he is fantastically rich, andrej babis. he says he is richer than donald trump. his fortune is estimated at $4 billion. donald trump only has three, but there are some things in common. he is plain
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speaking, he is a man of the people and he has a rather populist tinge to some of his remarks. for me, the big difference between donald trump and andrej babis is power. donald trump scored a massive victory in the states and is now president. andrej babis scored a big victory here, but he is a man about to be charged with leading coalition talks on forming a new government. it is not the same thing. he will find it very frustrating to put together that coalition, and forming a stable, viable government. but he is not the only populist leader in eastern europe, will this concerned the european union?” eastern europe, will this concerned the european union? i think there will be some concern, yes, in brussels, paris and berlin. andrej babis has been quick to say he is not anti—european. he has taken to task the journalist in the foreign media that have described him and his party as anti—europe and eurosceptic. the thing is, when you look at the thing he says about
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brussels and defending czech national interests against brussels, and also his very, very negative comments about the euros. he says it isa comments about the euros. he says it is a failed project, and the czechs shouldn't sign up to it. bureaucrats in brussels and in european capitals do have something to worry about with andrej babis. this is beyond 100 days, still to come, new files on the association of presidentjohn f. kennedy are set to be released. we look at what they could reveal. from today, here in london, drivers of older, more polluting vehicles will have to pay an extra £10 to drive through the city centre, the charge applies to diesel and petrol vehicles registered before 2006. london has some of the most polluted streets in europe,
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swimming in nitrogen dioxide and tiny particles invisible unless you use a special camera. it's a hidden killer. pollution's linked to lung and heart disease with children the most vulnerable. what i'm in favour of is encouraging people to change their behaviour so they stop driving the most polluting vehicles and start moving to either public transport, walking or cycling, or cleaner cars or vans. from today, anybody crossing this line in an older vehicle will have to pay an extra £10 for the privilege, and it looks like it's already affecting people's behaviour. when they first talked about this scheme back in february, they said around 10,000 vehicles per day would have to pay. a few months later, they're nowjust talking about 6,500 vehicles, which suggests that people are changing their cars and vans. it will affect many vehicles registered before 2006. if you include the congestion charge, midweek drivers could actually pay more than £21 a day. critics say it'll put small businesses under pressure. like barry neil, who mends computers then couriers them around the city. more than 50% of our business
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is in via small career companies. t charge means they're going to put their prices up or, effectively, go out of business, which means that, therefore, we're going to have to use bigger companies, which raises our bottom line, which means we're going to pass that on to our clients. so we're going to be more expensive. it is not just it is notjust a london bomb, many towns and cities have broken eu pollution limits, ponting calls for action. a london zone will be extended in a few years with even tougher rules on who has to pay to come in. you are watching tempering. few events in history draw as much interest and competing theories as the death of presidentjohn f caples assassination. he was killed in dallas by lee harvey oswald, but
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something the story —— something the story goes deeper. secret documents will be released from the case will stop donald trump tweeted this weekend: what could those files reveal? joining us now is the bbc‘s laura bicker. such a fascinating story, so much speculation. what are we anticipating? if you listen to scholars, they will tell you that decades of secrecy might be about to come to an end. these documents were locked away by law a 1992 law, 25 yea rs locked away by law a 1992 law, 25 years ago, to quell conspiracy theories. 30% of americans still believe that lee harvey oswald didn't act alone. the documents that they will be looking to uncover are any documents surrounding his visit
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to mexicojust weeks any documents surrounding his visit to mexico just weeks before the assassination. it is there it is alleged he did with cuban and soviet spies, and it is also alleged it has never been proven that he mentioned killing the president and his intention to kill the president. that is some of the things these documents can reveal. subject to the receipt of further information, he tweeted. is that a get out clause? there is a bit of a get out clause for the president. in a statement, the white house said, if there is a national security reason why these documents should not be released, then they won't be. however, it does seem then they won't be. however, it does seem likely that many of them will be. we have had about 88% of them released, there are 5 million documents on the kennedy and —— assassination. these are the last remaining 1%. it is documents such as the cia profile on lee harvey 0swald. there are roles of document relating to the testimony of cia
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officers at the time. scholars will be looking to see what they knew. what did they tell dallas police at the time? and what come if at all, they knew that this previous us member that defected to the soviet union was working on a site on president's motorcade route. the president has accused the father of senator ted cruz of being some way in goods with lee harvey oswald? president trumpism a stranger to conspiracy theories when it comes to the kennedy assassination. it was during a debate that he accused ted cruz‘s father of being with lee harvey oswald before the shooting, that has never been proved. when it comes to conspiracy theories, he is also behind the so—called movement that accused president 0bama of not being born in the united states. yes, he has form. he has never run a door apologised for that. thank you for now.
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it is known as the city that never sits, but is new york city losing its lustre. whoever gets the job will be charged with promoting and protecting the rich culture that has long made the city a draw for locals and tourists alike. it may sound like fun and games, but there are real challenges that lie ahead. it's the city that never sleeps. 0n the surface, night life in new york looks vibrant. but smaller libraries it venues have declined by wendy percent over the last 15 years. the new nightmare's main challenge, to promote a nightlife image that is often under siege. this man is the driving force behind the creation of the new nightmare position. that's the new nightmare position. that's the goal of the office, to make sure
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the goal of the office, to make sure the city's nightlife have an advocate where businesses feel they have a voice, and they are not being preyed upon by the city and communities. the industry is responsible for creating over 600,000 jobs across the city. it is a over $10 million industry. the new nightmare and may lessen what critics say is the stifling of nightlife businesses by city government agencies. but creating a city appointed official to promote and protect nightlife means this new nightmare is going to have to work ha rd to nightmare is going to have to work hard to win trust. i like the idea of somebody who would promote nightlife, but i don't trust the idea of the government appointing someone idea of the government appointing someone to do so. the new york city governor has intervened in nightlife negatively. and of giuliani made it pa rt of negatively. and of giuliani made it part of his campaign, but forgot that nightlife is a huge part of life in new york. the new york nightlife community is
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making its concerns known. it won't let its new office of nightlife of the. this town hall meeting has been making demands on what the new nightmare should do. and what the priority should be. rachel nelson owns three nightlife venues in brooklyn. we need them to be an advocate that stands up for us. we had to stand up and say it is important, and what we do is valuable, economically and socially and culturally. and city councilman hoped the new nightmare will ease the pressure on new york's like these it venues. those spaces are responsible for creating those spaces that have attracted many of the young people to move here and help the economy.
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whoever is appointed to this new nightlife position, there is the bonus of thejob nightlife position, there is the bonus of the job name. nightlife position, there is the bonus of thejob name. being called nightmare of new york has a certain cachet. an alternative title is reserved for nightlife. a very different kind ofjob. nightmare it probably will be. my my social life is a nightmare. what do they call them, a box set that, now my daughter is on the scene and my son. i'd never get out much. we have been talking... for you! i know! it's hopeless. -- poor you. this is a great of a different kind, this is the dog of the french president emmanuel macron, who has made his presence felt. take a look at this. i've often felt like that about
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planning meetings. you have a dog, is that right? yeah. do you bring your dog to work? very occasionally, but my dog would behave in an impeccable manner, is impeccably booked up and would never dream of doing anything so rude. there is alfie! there is alfie. what is alfie? he is a miniature german schnauzer. he may not mr hague in the office, however, one christmas, he got on the dining room table, eight mince pies. he had to go to the animal hospital, where $1300 later, two days later, he was taken
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home again. i would rather you peed in the leaves a palace than do things other. we have other presidential dogs will stop these were president 0bama's dogs. they were portuguese water dog ‘s. i think they were better behaved in the oval office. who is larry the cat? ten downing st! if you are looking for a good twitter account to follow, larry the cat is a very, very good tweeter.” like it. apparently, i read today, nicolas sarkozy‘s dog was also badly behaved. not the first dog that has misbehaved. coming up next on bbc world news, we have outside source. for the uk, we
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have outside source. for the uk, we have the headlines from ben brown. katty kay will be back at the same time tomorrow. thank you for watching. no huge changes to our weather for tomorrow. there is a bit of rain in the forecast, and it will remain mild, particularly in the southern half of the uk. a lot of cloud in the atlantic, this is a typical autumn picture. most of the cloud for the moment is streaming in from the south—west. there is a daisy chain of weather fronts out there. this is where the mild air is sitting, across the azores, moving sluggishly in our direction. this evening and overnight, the daisy—chain of weather fronts out there. this is where the mild air is sitting, across the azores, moving sluggishly in our direction. this evening and overnight, the daisy—chain of weather fronts approach the south—west. rain
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getting into pembrokeshire. you can see the weather front extends into north—western areas of the uk. temperatures in the morning, this is rush hour on tuesday, 15 in plymouth, taunton at 16, 15 in london. colder, less mild in north around 11 or 13 degrees in belfast. it is raining as well, not a grey start to the day. but at least it is not freezing cold. what will happen through the course of the day? the weather front keeps sliding in from the south—west. to the south of that, it will stay dry. southern counties might get brightness, it will not be too wet at all. 16 in plymouth, 18 in london. even in newcastle and belfast, temperatures in the mid—to high teens. wednesday, things will brighten up in the northern two thirds of the country. in the south, part of the weather front is sitting on top of us. a
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fair bit of cloud across the south—western areas of the uk. 0n thursday, the cloud is going to increase again, 17 degrees. not an awful lot of change as we go through the course of this week, an shine flyer, back to sunshine again, and rain thrown in. high precious it —— pressure set to build. the jet strea m pressure set to build. the jet stream is to the north, but the jet strea m stream is to the north, but the jet stream may drag in cooler and colder air into northern parts of the uk through the course of the weekend. it is settled, but it will turn a bit colder. this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. prime minister theresa may insists progress was made at last week's eu summit, facing labour claims that her brexit approach is chaotic and damaging. by approaching these negotiations in a constructive way, in a spirit of friendship and cooperation, we can and will deliver the best possible outcome that works for all our people.
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meanwhile, the european commission president denies saying that mrs may had been despondent and begging for help last week. she was not tired, she was fighting, as is her duty, so everything for me was ok. so she didn't plead with you for help? no, no. the widow of an american soldier who died in action says president trump struggled to remember his name when he called to offer sympathy. an army sergeant accused of sabotaging his wife's parachute also coming up this hour, a united nations plea forfurther
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